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Broadcast Pioneers Hall of Fame

We would like to thank iHeart Media, Colorado Broadcasters Association, KUSA-TV, Lincoln Financial Media Group and La Jota Mexicana for sponsoring the 2014 Broadcast Pioneers Hall of Fame.

Also check out The Lowell Thomas Award, honoring broadcasters with Colorado roots who've achieved success at the national level. The 2014 recipient is Ann Richardson.

2014 Inductees

Jean Ruth Hay

 

Steve Keeney

 

Mike Landess

 

Andrés Neidig

 

William D. "Doc" Reynolds

 

Mick Schafbuch


2013 Inductees

Rick BarberRick Barber

 

 

 

 

Allan BissetAllan Bisset

 

Jack CarverJack Carver

 

Noell CusterNoell Custer

 

Morey DaVoltMorey DaVolt

 

Bill PiersonBill Pierson

 

2012 Inductees

Dick Brehm
Dick BrehmFor nearly 30 years, Dick Brehm was on Denver radio. He started at KHOW in 1958 as an announcer and an engineer for baseball and basketball home games (he also created and produced recreations of away games). He produced and hosted at KGMC AM from 1961 to 1964 and for the next three years was afternoon DJ at Gene Amole’s KDEN. In 1967 Brehm joined Denver’s Classical KVOD, where in the beginning he was on air 12 hours a day (6 hours live and 6 hours recorded). For 20 years his distinctive voice was heard on KVOD, where he also served as program director.

Rolly Dalquist
Rolly DalquistRolly Dalquist (Carl Rollwyn Dalquist) joined KLZ TV in 1956 while still in the army following service in Korea and Japan. He started as a part time news photographer, becoming Chief of News Photography and a nationally honored documentary producer. Among others, he wrote, directed and produced the 1967 Emmy Award winning documentary “The Road to Nowhere” For over a decade he was a producer for the commercial production arm of Channel 7. For nearly 20 years, he was a public relations executive, founding “Dalquist Communications” in 1982. Dalquist passed away in 2005.

Lee Douglas
Lee DouglasLee Douglas (Douglas Lee Cooley) began his broadcasting career in 1973, the same year he graduated high school in Pueblo. He worked part-time at KDZA radio while attending CSU-Pueblo, going full-time after graduation. For the better part of thirty years, Douglas reported sports in Southern Colorado. He joined KOAA TV in 1979 as a sports broadcaster. He left briefly in the 1980s to become an assistant city manager of Pueblo. In 2000, he was named KOAA News 5/30 sports director. He served as color commentator for Air Force Academy Football for seven seasons, and for years hosted an oldies show on KDZA. Douglas passed away unexpectedly on Super Bowl Sunday, 2012.

Ron Mitchell
Ron MitchellRon Mitchell began his broadcasting career in 1960 on Denver’s KICN radio. He also was on air at KOSI AM, KXXI, KMOR and KBTR. In 1971 he moved from KBTR radio to sister station KBTV Channel 9, which would become KUSA. In 1973 he did a five part series and half an hour documentary on the construction of the Eisenhower Tunnel, and continued his excellent reporting on 9News for 25 years. In addition to reporting, he also worked as assignment editor, backup news and sports anchor and weekend anchor— but he is best known for his work as a field reporter.

Gil Mueller Gil Mueller
Military veteran Gil Mueller joined KLZ-TV in 1951, two years before the station signed on the air. In addition to engineering work for KLZ radio, he modified an old Packard garage to become TV studios and installed and maintained the studio equipment, news cameras and remote trucks. His engineering skills put Channel 7 on the air and he developed and built technical TV equipment replicated by stations nationwide. He frequently provided engineering assistance to others, and received recognition from RCA for solving a problem for them. Mueller retired from KMGH in 1987.

2011 Inductees

Jim Lannon

Jim LannonJames Lannon found a home at Denver’s Channel 7 where he stayed for 27 years.

After his graduation with honors from the University of Denver in 1952, he joined KLZ-TV. He started there just before it went on the air in 1953 and stayed until his retirement from KMGH-TV in 1980.

He began as a camera operator and then was promoted to full time producer /director. He produced the acclaimed series “Panorama,” hosted by Gene Amole, which earned Channel 7 a George Foster Peabody award in 1957. Lannon directed many local TV firsts: the first live Denver Symphony telecast, the first video-tape of a heart transplant, the first film coverage of NORAD and the first time cameras were allowed in the Denver FBI Office.

James has been a member of both the Colorado Speliological Society and the Littleton Gem and Mineral Society. He’s been recognized by the Colorado Heart Association, the Muscular Dystrophy Association and the Colorado School of Mines.

Lee Larsen

Lee LarsenLee Larsen’s 48 year career in broadcasting started as an announcer at a small radio station in Southern California. After work at stations including KFI and KLOS in Los Angeles, he came to Denver.

In 1983 he joined KOA-KOAQ radio stations as General Manager and never left, spending 23 years as a leader in Colorado broadcasting. He retired as President and Market Manager of Clear Channel Colorado in December 2010.

He was twice President of the Colorado Broadcasters Association and has been recognized as Larsen Colorado Broadcaster of the Year multiple times. He was also named one of the Top 50 Best Managers in Radio by Radio Ink Magazine.

Larsen founded the “Never Forgotten Fund” and served on numerous boards including the Denver Metro Chamber of Commerce, Denver Metro Convention and Visitors Bureau, the Elway Foundation, Craig Hospital, the Pepperdine University Alumni Association and the Denver Broncos Charities.

Ed Sardella

Ed SardellaEd Sardella broadcast for over 32 years in Denver. After graduating from Occidental College in Los Angeles, Ed served as Communications Officer in the US Marine Corps. Upon completing his service in 1966 he worked first in radio and then TV in Oregon.

After moving to Denver in 1972 to become a news and sports reporter and anchor at KLZ-TV, he moved to KBTV (now KUSA) as the primary sports anchor. He was soon promoted to the news anchor desk. A year later Channel 9 became a market leader in Denver and remained so for the rest of his career.

9News named him one of the two recipients of its Half Century Award in recognition of his contribution to the station’s success in its first 50 years, Sardella has been honored with Emmy Awards for excellence in news and is a member of the Heartland Chapter of the National Association of Television Arts and Sciences Silver Circle. He retired as primary anchor and senior editor in May of 2004.

Evan Slack

Evan SlackEvan Slack’s broadcasting career has lasted for nearly six decades and he is still on the air doing what he loves.

His work as a farm and ranch reporter began in 1952 in Springfield, Missouri. After a three year enlistment in the US Marine Corps, he earned a degree in Agriculture from the University of Missouri.

In 1958 he moved west and soon joined KHOW where he stayed for five years before moving to KLZ for the next eight years.

In 1967 he earned his pilot's license and began flying to report on agricultural stories. Slack did network broadcasting for the Intermountain Network (IMN) and then spent many years on-air at KOA.

Since 1985 he has owned the Evan Slack Network where he is currently reporting for over 40 radio stations in nine states and Canada. He was awarded lifetime membership by the Colorado Cattleman’s Association and is a past president of the National Association of Farm Broadcasters and a member of the NAFB Hall of Fame.

2010 Inductees

Warren Chandler

Warren ChandlerWarren Chandler, who passed away on May 22, 2010, was a long time popular newscaster and weather forecaster on KLZ radio and KLZ-TV, now KMGH.

Before his professional career the Denver native served in the US Navy during WWII where he was a radioman aboard the USS Ticonderoga and USS Topeka. During his tour of duty he earned the American Theater and Asiatic Pacific Area Regions ribbons and two Battle Stars.

After helping to establish college radio station KVDU at the University of Denver, he began his broadcast career in Phoenix. At KOOL he produced radio dramas and was named Production Manager and Program Director.

Returning to Denver in 1953 he joined KLZ Radio and KLZ-TV and was on the air reporting news and weather through 1977. Area listeners and viewers relied on and trusted his reports and during his tenure KLZ was the news rating leader in the area.

His next assignment was as a member of the US Peace Corps. He and his wife, Loni, spent two years in Chile teaching and assisting there to improve the native’s daily lives.

Upon returning to Denver he resumed weather reporting duties on KOA -TV and KWGN-TV. In 1981 the Chandlers produced audio-video programs about their travels which were shown on local stations and at functions in the area.

Chandler received numerous awards over his 40 years of broadcasting including the Smoky Bear Award for his crusade against forest fires.

 

Bertha Lynn

Bertha LynnBertha Lynn is one of Denver’s most recognized and honored broadcast journalists. Currently Anchor of the 11:00 AM Channel 7 News, she has been reporting the news to Coloradans for 30 years.

From 1976 to 1984 Lynn was News Anchor/Reporter at KBTV-TV (Now KUSA-TV) before moving to KMGH-TV. She hosted “Smith & Lynn” with Harry Smith on KRMA-TV and also hosted “Educator’s Edge” and MetroBeat-TV’s “People to Watch”.

Active in the Denver community she serves as a trustee of Regis University and is a member of the Denver Art Museum’s African American Outreach Task Force. She served for six years on the Scientific and Cultural Facilities District Board, an appointment made by Governor Roy Romer.

Lynn is an award-winning broadcast journalist. Recognition includes the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences Heartland Chapter Silver Circle Inductee, an Emmy as Host of MetroBeat TV “People to Watch” for Interview/Discussion Program, an Emmy for Best News Anchor and another Emmy for Best Morning/Noon News, Colorado Association of Black Journalists President’s Award, CABJ Journalist of the Year for Broadcasting, CABJ Legacy award (renamed Bertha Lynn Legacy Award), University of Denver Distinguished Communicator Award and Girl Scouts Mile Hi Council Women’s Leadership Circle

Hal Moore

Hal MooreLegendary Denver broadcaster Hal Moore has achieved what few ever will: a lifelong career in radio.

Moore’s 40 plus years in radio include evening-show host and music director at KIMN in Denver, drive-time show host and music director at Cleveland’s WKYC and an unheard of 28 years on Denver's KHOW, much of that time as co-host of the “Hal and Charley” morning show with Charley Martin.

In addition to his unique on-air work and roles as music and program director, Moore has also held the positions of operations and station manager. He has received the Gavin Music Director of the Year and Billboard’s AC Personality of the Year awards and been nominated for the Radio Hall of Fame.

Moore says, “Now I’m doing mornings playing 1950s and 1960s songs on the old KIMN 950 frequency; it seems so crazy to be back on the station that brought me to Denver in 1964, KRWZ (Cruisin’ 950) and the reaction has really been unbelievable ... so many listeners missed hearing these songs ... lots of fun for me. I’m continuing voicetracking the morning show on the True Country format for Dial-Global, formerly Jones Radio Oldies format.”

Stations where Moore has worked include: KSO, Des Moines, IA, 1959; KIOA, Des Moines, 1961; KIMN, Denver, 1964; WHK, Cleveland, OH, 1967; WKYC, Cleveland, 1968; and Denver stations KHOW, 1969; KEZW, 1996; KCKK, 1998; KXKL, 2001; Jones/Dial-Global Net, 2002; and
KRWZ, 2008.

Herb Schubarth

Herb SchubarthHerb Schubarth is recognized as an outstanding technical innovator who used his skill and knowledge of electronics to consistently improve television broadcasting.

Schubarth served in the Navy in WWII where he taught radar electronics. Following his discharge in 1949 he was hired as a radio engineer at KRDO-AM in Colorado Springs but eleven months later was recalled to serve in the Korean War. After he returned to KRDO as the Chief Engineer, Schubarth was instrumental in designing and installing the technical TV facilities which put KRDO-TV on the air in 1953.

In 1961, KBTV Channel 9 in Denver, now KUSA-TV, hired Schubarth and never let him go. One of his early duties was to drive a remote truck from Washington, DC to Denver which was Channel 9’s first non-studio broadcast facility.

As Channel 9’s Chief Engineer by 1967, Schubarth was soon named to an additional position as Corporate Director of Engineering for Mullins Broadcasting and it’s successor Combined Communications Corporation.
He was named the VP of Engineering for Gannett Broadcasting and Combined Communications Corporation in 1981. While at Gannett he was a member of the capital committee overseeing and approving capital projects throughout the corporation. At retirement he was responsible for 16 TV stations and 13 radio stations.

Schubarth served as the President of the Institute of Electrical Electronics Engineers (IEEE) for three years, and is a long time member of the Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers (SMPTE) and a member of Maximum Service Telecasters (MST). In 1993 Herb received the National Association of Broadcasters (NAB) Engineering and Achievement Award.

2009 Inductees

Gene L Huston

Gene HustonGene Huston started life in Neligh, Nebraska and left his home town in 1951 to join the US Air Force. Following his discharge from service he was hired by Montgomery Ward in Denver but was soon transferred with the company to Sterling, Colorado. Ward’s operation there did not last but Huston’s Sterling association was just beginning.

In 1967 Huston, looking for a new opportunity, joined the sales staff at KTVS-TV. Recognizing his ability he was promoted to sales manager, his position until 1974. At that time he became general manager of the station. Under his leadership the Channel 3 news and weather coverage was developed and became vital since it covered the entire Northeast area of the state.

A very important member of the community he worked to promote tourism in the Sterling area. He was active in the Logan County Chamber of Commerce and served as president of the Miss Colorado State Scholarship Pageant. Huston is a life member of the Disabled Veterans Association and in 1978 was recognized by KBTV for his volunteer service. He served six years on the board of directors for the Colorado Broadcasters Association.

In 1992 Huston retired from KTVS-TV Channel 3 in Sterling. However, in 2001 KCDO-TV in Sterling hired him as manager of the station taking advantage of his many years of experience. He is still there hard at work in the TV industry and continuing to serve Sterling, his favorite Colorado community.

Tom Mulvey

Tom MulveyNebraska native Tom Mulvey has been active in every area of broadcasting and advertising for over 50 years. His early career was in sales with Channel 2 in Denver, KLZ radio and KTLN. After a stay at KOA radio he became sales manager at KHOW in 1957. His next broadcast achievement was his promotion to general manager of the station.

From 1963 until 1967 he was associated with three of Denver’s top radio stations: KLZ, KLAK and KOSI. He then became general manager of KBTR radio and changed the format from rock to news, just the sixth station in the country to go all news.

Mulvey then turned to publishing and co-founded Media Memo, a broadcast industry magazine. In 1983 he created Colorado MAC News which stood for Media, Agencies and Clients. With his column in Advertising and Marketing Review he kept readers up to date on people and activities in the media business.

For two years Mulvey and Merrie Lynn McNabb hosted a senior talk show that aired on KHOW, KEZW and KDEN. Mulvey also taught broadcasting at Metro State College as an adjunct professor.

in 1997, he was elected as a Littleton City councilman and served as mayor pro tem. He was one of the founders of the Metro Denver Dinosaurs as well as the Broadcast Professionals of Colorado.

Tom Mulvey’s vast experience in broadcasting has touched many lives and his BPC and Denver Dinosaur friendships attest to that fact.

John Rayburn

John RayburnBorn in Anna, Illinois John Rayburn excelled in sports during his school years but athletics were set aside when in 1945 he joined the US Navy. His education was at The College of St. Thomas in St. Paul and at Iowa State in Ames.
Rayburn’s broadcasting career began over 62 years ago at Cape Girardeau, Missouri, where he was a staff announcer and sportscaster. In the following years he was employed in Farmington, Missouri; Harlingen, Texas; Mt. Vernon and Peoria, Illinois.

Heading to Denver Rayburn began his on air activities at Channel 4 KOA-TV in 1959 winding up as the 10PM news anchor. Next was a switch to Channel 7 KLZ-TV in 1963 where he was hired to do sports coverage and worked with Carl Akers, Starr Yelland and Warren Chandler as the team dominated the market. In 1966 he replaced Akers as KLZ-TV news anchor.

After a brief stay in Kansas City as lead anchor at WDAF-TV he returned to Denver. Rejoining Akers they co-anchored the news on Channel 9 KBTV-TV. When Akers shifted away from his anchoring duties Rayburn paired up with Ed Sardella and they were the team that moved Channel 9 into first place in the ratings in the mid 1970’s. His well remembered closing was always, “May all your news be good news!”

Rayburn is the only anchor to have worked for all three Denver network affiliates and was the first play by play broadcaster in the Super Dome for a Denver Broncos exhibition game. He wore many hats during his Colorado tenure as he broadcast Denver Bears baseball, DU hockey, preseason Denver Broncos football, Air Force Academy football and CSU football. We say “Well done, John.”

Larry Zimmer

Larry ZimmerAt the age of ten Larry Zimmer began to dream of being a sportscaster. He did his first broadcast while in high school at WJBO in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. After pursuing a journalism degree at both LSU and the University of Missouri he began his sports casting at KFRU in Columbia, Missouri. He called high school games and Missouri Tigers basketball and baseball before moving to WAAM in Ann Arbor, Michigan. There he became the voice of Wolverines football, basketball and hockey.

In 1971 Zimmer moved to Denver and joined KOA radio before becoming the sports anchor on KOA-TV in the mid 70’s. For 19 years he worked with sportscaster Bob Martin as the color commentator on the Denver Broncos Network.
He took over the Bronco play by play duties from 1990 to 1996. During the 1995 season he broadcast his 500th Bronco game.

He has enjoyed a long association with the University of Colorado doing play by play for Colorado Buffalos football. In 2004 he moved to the color commentary spot for CU football and currently broadcasts with KOA’s Mark Johnson. He also did play by play for the CSU Rams and was the voice of CU Buffalo basketball from 1985 to 2003.

In December of 2009 he will receive the prestigious Chris Schenkel Award which will recognize Zimmer for his distinguished career broadcasting college football and for his long association with the University of Colorado.

Lifetime Achievement Award - Noel L Jordan

Noel JordanA New York City boy, Noel Jordan traveled to Boston where he earned his BA at Harvard University. After returning to NYC he was hired immediately by NBC where he started at the bottom of the ladder as a page and clerk. The timing was good and Jordan soon found himself promoted to the newly formed television department. There he gained experience as property man, floor manager and, in a crisis, spare announcer. Jordan was part of the original station staff when NBC inaugurated the first regular TV broadcast service in the United States. The first show was President Roosevelt at the New York World’s Fair, April 30, 1939.

After serving in the U.S. Army Signal Corps during WWII, Noel Jordan was soon recognized as a capable TV producer/director and he quickly earned a reputation as a remote broadcast specialist. He directed many firsts for NBC including the first live telecast from the United Nations, from a submarine, from an aircraft carrier, of Toscanini’s NBC Symphony Orchestra and the 1948 Republican, Democratic and Progressive Political Conventions from Philadelphia. He was also an accomplished writer for the network handling genres from documentaries to dramas.

Jordan was asked in 1948 to join the radio television faculty at the University of Denver. One of his first assignments was to prepare the KLZ staffers for their transition to television. Their training started two years before Channel 7 went on the air. He was also one of the founders of Western Cine in Denver which for years processed all of the news film for the Denver TV stations.

He prepared many of the current BPC membership for successful careers in broadcasting and communications. The list includes Ken Custer, Jim Lannon, Art Knott, Merrie Lynn McNabb, Ron Mitchell, Jack Mumey, Ann Richardson, Bob Rubin, Jerome Ryden, Phil Stinemates and Joe Tourtelot.

Noel Jordan is one of the true pioneers of the television industry.

2008 inductees

Bob Hix

Don JohnsonBob Hix grew up in Albuquerque, NM and graduated from the University of New Mexico. He was drafted into the Army in 1941, later graduated from Officers Candidate School and served for five years as a special staff officer with the Third Armored "Spearhead" Division during World War 11. He attained the rank of Captain.

In 1947, Hix became involved in broadcast management in Wichita, KS before moving to Denver in 1953. He was Sales Manager for three years and then was named General Manager of KOA Radio. In 1959 he became General Manager of KHOW Radio.

In 1960 he opened the Bob Hix Company, a sales and management company that represented radio and television stations throughout the Rocky Mountain West. He was President of the firm for 28 years.

Hix was an active member of Augustana Lutheran Church and a Life Member of Lions International where he served as a Director, Trustee and President of the Lions Club of Denver Foundation. He was honored as Lion of the Year in 1987-88. After retirement he assisted with marketing and fundraising efforts for the Rocky Mountain Lions Eye Institute. He also served as President of the National Association of Credit Management, Secretary of the Colorado Broadcasters Association, Denver Chamber of Commerce Ways & Means Committee, Denver Sales Executives Club Vice President, and Denver Better Business Bureau Board of Directors. Other organizations included The Denver Advertising Federation, Broadcast Professionals of Colorado and Metro Denver Dinosaurs.

Bob Hix passed away on July 22, 2008 after a short illness.

Fred Hobbs

Don MartinFred Rodgers Hobbs, broadcaster, public relations executive and educator, was born April 21, 1932 in Denver. He graduated from the University of Colorado school of Journalism and Mass Communications with a B.A. degree in 1954.

Hobbs began his broadcasting career as a teenage student disc jockey on KFEL-FM in Denver (the first FM radio station in the city) in 1948. While attending the University of Colorado, from 1951 to 1954, he worked at KBOL-AM in Boulder.

From 1954-1956, Hobbs served in the US Army His radio background led to his joining American Forces Network's station in Berlin, Germany as a disc jockey and feature reporter.

In 1957, he returned to KBOL as afternoon host and served as Promotion Manager then Program Director. In 1960, KDEN radio in Denver hired him as an on-air personality and soon he became News Director. In 1966, Hobbs joined KLZ-AM and TV (now KMGH-TV), and became the State Government reporter and weekend news Anchor.

He entered the Public Relations business in 1972 as the Media Relations Director at the University of Colorado.
From 1977 to 1982, Hobbs was News Director KWGN-TV, Channel 2. He left television to return to PR business as Director of Marketing and Public Affairs, AMC Cancer Research Center from 1982-1985. In 1989, Hobbs went on his own and founded Public Relations Associates, which he headed until semi-retirement in 2000.

From 1988 to 1994 and 1997 to 2001, Hobbs was an Adjunct Professor at the University of Colorado School of Journalism, teaching public relations. Hobbs has stayed active by contributing his broadcast and PR expertise as a member the Radio Historical Association of Colorado, the Lions Club of Denver, the Denver Press Club and as President of both the Colorado Chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists and the Broadcast Professionals of Colorado.

Roger Ogden

Jack MillerA Colorado native, Roger Ogden's first television experience came at KBTV-TV (now KUSA) in 1968, working as a reporter, part-time anchor, Assignment Editor and Managing News Director. In 1977 he took a job as news director at WLKY in Louisville, KY - moving back to Denver the following year as News Director at KBTV.

From 1981-95 he was the President and General Manager of KOA-TV (then affiliated with NBC) where he focused so intently on news that he had the call letters changed to KCNC - Colorado's News Channel. It was during this time that Roger's commitment to local news and to serving the community began to set the standard in local television: coverage of the Bolder Boulder 10K race, adding morning news, afternoon news, expanding newscasts, telecasts of local high school and college sports.

For two years he was President and GM of NBC Europe in London, returning to Denver and KUSA in 1997 as President and GM of Gannett-owned 9News. From there he moved to Gannett Corporate headquarters as President and CEO of Gannett Broadcast, then added the title Senior Vice President Design, Innovation and Strategy of Gannett Corporation where he oversaw the entire broadcast division for Gannett, which includes KUSA-TV, Channel 9 and KTVD Channel 20 in Denver. As Senior Vice President of Gannett Corporation, he was instrumental in planning the growth and future of Gannett.

His belief in hard competition and good sportsmanship set the tone for the market. His focus on innovation and technology has resulted in KUSA being one of three stations in the country broadcasting local news in HDTV. His legacy of leadership includes innovative new community-oriented programs, dedication to news, and team building. In addition, he is one of the founding GMs of the NATAS Heartland Chapter, and a strong supporter of the Colorado Broadcast Pioneers and the Colorado Broadcasters Association.

Al Perry

Merwin SmithSixty years ago in 1948, Al Perry started in the radio business as an announcer at KDZA-AM in Pueblo. He quickly moved on to KCSJ-AM, and then to Denver at the storied KMYR where he worked with Gene Amole, Ed Koepke, and Dick Schmidt.

While at the University of Denver in 1950, he joined the ROTC and was activated to duty in 1951 as a second Lieutenant. In 1953 Perry came back to an on-camera position at KKTV Colorado Springs. In 1955 he moved back to Denver as a Sales Rep for KLZ-AM, then to KTLN-AM in 1958 as General Sales Manager.

In 1959 he returned to Pueblo to build and manage KTUX-AM and by 1961 had built it into a powerhouse and the station was sold. Then, in  1962 he joined KOA-TV channel 4 as a sales rep and Local Sales manager. He spent 11 years at Channel 4.

Perry then returned to Denver and joined Ed Scott at KLAK-AM as General Manager. In 1973 he joined Bill Armstrong at KOSI-AM & FM as General Manager where he stayed until 1983.
Through the years, Perry had remained in the Army Reserve. In 1974 he was promoted to full Colonel and remained active until retirement in 1981.

After leaving KOSI in 1983, Perry moved into the media broker business and in 1988 formed Satterfield and Perry, a national Radio-TV Broker based in Denver.

Perry has been a member of the Denver Press Club since 1949, and an original member of the Metro Denver Dinosaurs. He has served as President of the CBA, Denver Ad Club and National Media Brokers Association. He was named CBA Broadcaster of the Year in 1979 and Ad Professional of the Year by the Ad Club the same year.

2007 Inductees

Don Johnson

Don JohnsonFrom Junior High School teacher to the Denver Public School administrative area where he started working with KRMA-TV, Johnson developed a unique series of on-air summer school courses that were place into national distribution. He soon became supervisor of station operations and was charged with staging a fund-raising auction.

Johnson was named General Manager of the station in 1983 and convinced the school board the station could better serve the public if it was independent of the DPS. His project them became finding better facilities and he put together a complicated financial and land swap arrangement with Channel 9 that acquired the Channel 9 property on Bannock Street.

Under his leadership, Channel 6 was consistently in the top 10 of public TV stations in audience-share and community support. Johnson received the NATAS Board of Governor’s Award in 1992-93 and was named 1993 Broadcaster of the Year by the Colorado Broadcasters Association, the year he retired from KRMA-TV.

Don Martin

Don MartinDon Martin carved a unique, long and successful career in Denver radio stations. These included KTLN, KHOW, KOA, KMYR, KFML, KLAJ, KJAE, KICN, and KIMN. It began at KDFM, when as a junior at South High School; Martin built and programmed his own station, using his own initials for call letters. It was licensed by the FCC and covered only his immediate neighborhood. Don’s career as a broadcaster was officially launched.

For much of that career, Don not only was on the air but IN the air as Denver’s first traffic reporter, flying over the skies of the metro area. It was Don Martin who coined the still-used “Mousetrap” to describe the traffic clogged intersection of I-25 and I-70.

A commanding voice and presence in Denver radio news, Martin built an outstanding news operation as News Director of KIMN radio. When the station was sold Martin moved the equipment and staff to KLAK/KJAE-FM. Soon, KIMN was resold and Martin was invited back and once again, KIMN News became a news force in Denver.

Because of his talent, leadership and innovation in the business, Don was the recipient of numerous honors and public service commendations during his broadcasting career. The accolades include an award of excellence from Sigma Delta Chi Journalistic Fraternity, today the Society of Professional Journalists. In 1982, he formed Don Martin Productions, providing audio and video production services for clients locally and nationally.

Jack Miller

Jack MillerJack Miller is an outstanding example of a successful community broadcaster…serving his stations’ listeners and supporting worthwhile community needs.

In 1956, he started his broadcast career in his hometown, Norfolk, Nebraska as an announcer and salesman at WJAG.
Three years later, Jack was named general manager at KCSR radio in Chadron, Nebraska, where for more than a decade he was a leader in key service organizations and activities while successfully guiding tahe

It was Miller’s move to Fort Collins in 1971 that signaled the beginning of a 32-year span of achievement in broadcasting.   As vice president and general manager of KCOL- AM and FM, Jack led the stations’ successful programming and sales efforts resulting in countless awards and listener accolades.  KCOL editorialized three days weekly with time for citizen response to the opinions expressed.

The stations aired numerous public service announcements and programs.   Miller’s philosophy:  “Service to the community must be an integral part of every broadcast day.”  He was a long and loyal supporter of Colorado State University and especially CSU’s annual student “Broadcast Day.”

Under Jack’s tutelage, KCOL developed an award-winning news operation, receiving extra special commendations for the stations’ extensive around the clock coverage of the disastrous Big Thompson flood in 1976.

Throughout his career, Miller has remained active in broadcast industry issues and activities.  He was named Colorado Broadcaster of the Year in 1981 and served two terms as president of the Colorado Broadcasters Association in 1977-78 and again in 1982-83.   He was featured in the 1986 edition of Builders in Broadcasting.

Prior to his retirement in 2003, Jack was involved in business development and sales a KUAD-FM in Windsor.  As to his concerns about broadcasting , Miller offered this thought in a publication back in 1977.  “That broadcasting remains the free system that is the envy of the entire world.” 

Merwin Smith

Merwin SmithFrom his appearances as a member of the campus broadcasting club at Colorado State College of Education in Greeley in 1948, Smith was hired by a brand new radio station at the time…KYOU, announcing news and farm reports, hosting a record show, providing color commentary on live sports broadcasts and other on-air assignments.

In the early 1950’s and Smith was drafted into the army.   He was stationed at Armed Forces Radio’s Far East Network in Tokyo, where he served as staff announcer, chief announcer and program director. After his military service was over, Smith wanted to work in Denver, but no openings were available then so a Far East Network alum talked him into moving to Buffalo, New York where he worked at WKBW as announcer and board op.

Smith, like most Coloradans, decided to come home.  He was hired by KFEL-AM and also became Denver’s second TV booth announcer when KFEL-TV, Channel 2 went on the air. The radio station was sold shortly thereafter and became the legendary KIMN…KIM.   At about the same time, Channel 2 cutback its hours of operation after losing its three network affiliations to new Denver TV stations and Smith was let go.   KIMN snapped him up and he became the evening DJ…the Tune Smith. 

Smith’s next broadcast stop in Denver was a long and very successful one at KLZ radio and television, where he first served as staff announcer, news and weather caster, and actor and producer on the radio station’s Funny Paper Show.  On KLZ-TV, Channel 7, Smith was featured on weather shows as well as commercials and on-air interviews in an eleven year stint.   Later, he became the station’s sales service manager, then program director and pioneered in a new division of the station…Time Life 7 Productions, which produced commercials, industrial and educational videos and films.   Over a long period, Smith was the voice of commercials for Coors, brewed with pure Rocky Mountain spring water!  Another sale and another switch brought Smith back to the radio side for two years.

Smith crowned his long and successful career with his renowned voice talent applied to the Talking Book program of the Library of Congress National Library Service.  He was honored with the prestigious Alexander Scourby Narrator of the Year Award from the American Foundation for the Blind.  And, upon his retirement in 1998, Smith also received the Didymus Award for his “excellence, diligence and perseverance” in narrating more than 465 talking books.

2006 Inductees

Bill Armstrong

Bill ArmstrongBill Armstrong was born in Fremont, Nebraska on March 16,1937.  He attended Tulane University and the University of Minnesota. He has received honorary degrees from 5 Universities.

Since holding his first radio job in Fremont, Nebraska, Armstrong has maintained a lifelong interest in broadcasting. He owned KOSI-AM & FM in Denver, and was President of television stations in Idaho and Wyoming.  He also served as President of the Colorado Springs
Sun newspaper.  Armstrong bought KOSI-AM in 1959 and added the FM side in 1968. He owned both stations until 1981 when he sold the FM to Westinghouse’s Group W, then about one year later sold the AM station to Group W.

Armstrong served 28 years in public office, starting with the Colorado House of Representatives from 1963 to1965. When Colorado was awarded a 5th congressional district, he won the position and served as the U.S. Representative from Colorado fro 1972 to 1978. In 1978, he ran for U. S. Senate where he served 12 years. He was a member of the Senate Finance Committee, the Senate Banking Committee and the Senate Budget Committee. For 6 years, he served as Chairman of the Senate Republican Policy Committee. 

While in the Senate, Armstrong led a four-year effort to gain live, gavel-to-gavel radio and TV coverage of the Senate proceeding so America can monitor their elected representatives as they conducted the national business.

On August 15, 2006, he was named President of Colorado Christian University in Lakewood, Colorado.

Lee Fondren

Lee FondrenLee Fondren is a nationally known leader in the advertising industry…award-winning broadcast executive…prominent civic and community leader.

A native Texan, Lee was a young on-air performer, entertainer and continuity writer at KGNC in Amarillo, Texas.

In Albuquerque, Lee worked at KGGM.  His combined sales and program duties included hosting a "man on the street" interview show, chatting on-air  celebrities,  including singer Kate Smith and Johnny, the famed Philip Morris cigarette bell boy.

It was in Denver where Lee found his long-time radio home at 560 on the dial…KLZ Radio.  He arrived in  and was there from 1941 until 1970, with a three year stint out for army service in the Pacific.

Lee compiled an outstanding record of achievement in broadcasting during his 29 years at KLZ Radio. He rose quickly to sales and management positions including promotion manager, national sales manager, director of sales and stations manager for both KLZ-AM and FM.

In the broadcast industry, Lee's leadership was recognized locally and nationally.    Key positions included: president of the Advertising Club of Denver, Chairman of the national council of Alpha Delta Sigma, (national advertising fraternity), chairman of the Radio Code board of the National Association of Broadcasters, and chairman of CBS Radio network affiliates.

He was Chairman of both the Advertising Federation of America and the Advertising Association of the West and a key figure in their merger as the American Advertising Federation, the voice of advertising in the USA. He was also honored as the AAF Advertising Man of the Year.

Bob MacLauchlin

Bob MacLauchlinDr. Robert MacLauchlin grew up in Massachusetts on Cape Cod. In 1948, his high school principal told him he was not college material and should not go to college. At the same  time, his Junior Achievement Broadcast company sold stock and declared a 100 percent dividend, an event that made the 1948 edition of Saturday Evening Post with his picture at the microphone.

He attended the  University of Massachusetts and was elected to the Men’s Judiciary and was chief announcer of the University’s FM Station.

In 1955 he volunteered for the military, becoming and Army combat infantry Medic.  After the Army, he earned two Masters Degrees, one in Radio-Television. At the University of  Maine where he built a Broadcast program, that encompassed a new FM station and a program for University of Maine sports broadcasts and TV remotes. He was the first director of programming for the Maine Educational TV.

In 1969, MacLauchlin came to Colorado State University, where he built new, rigorous Liberal Arts oriented undergraduate programs in radio, television ands cable TV. He received numerous awards for his teaching curriculum and programs.

This includes the nationally recognized High School Broadcasting Institute and CSU Broadcast Day event which brought state, regional, national And international  recognition from broadcast, cable and political leaders to the  CSU campus. This included two FCC commissioners, a network president, an NAB president and former President Gerald R. Ford.

A surprise 1997 retirement part at CSU was highlighted by testimonials from former students including KCNC-TV’s  Larry Green and former Channel 4 educational  specialist Karen Layton who were in attendance. The evening included many more former students, broadcasters and colleagues.

Bob Palmer

Bob PalmerBob Palmer is  a 4th generation Coloradoan. He attended West High School for two years, then moved to Lafayette where he graduated from Lafayette High. After marrying, but before graduating from College, he served four years in the U.S. Navy. 

He then returned to the University of Colorado and finished his degree in Journalism.  While at CU, the News Director at KOA radio called the CU Journalism Dean and asked for an older student who could work part time as a copy writer. Bob got the job. He worked both at KOA radio and TV where he learned to shoot and edit film, announced on radio and did some reporter stand-ups on TV.

When he graduated from CU in 1960, he took a full time job at KOA. His first big story as a full time reporter was the Coors kidnapping in 1960.  From 1961-63, he hosted an in depth documentary called SCOPE.  In 1963, he  became the Channel 4 anchor. In 1968,  KOA-TV was sold, Palmer approached Hugh Terry at Channel 7 to join Starr Yelland and Warren Chandler.  He anchored the Cannel 7 news for nearly 14 years.

By that time, Roger Ogden had joined Channel 4.  Palmer called Ogden and returned to Channel 4 in 1982 to anchor evening newscasts. He retired from the 10 PM News after a  29 consecutive year run on Denver television on November 25, 1992. 

Palmer gave back to the University of Colorado  by funding the Bob Palmer Scholarship in Journalism, one the of largest scholarships at the CU Journalism school.

2005 Inductees

Fred Arthur

Fred ArthurBorn in Ohio, Fred Arthur came west to Denver to become a broadcaster. His first attempts to land a job in Denver radio were unsuccessful, so he moved to KVOC in Casper, where in addition to his on-air duties, he began writing and performing comedic spots for the stations advertising clients.

Arthur made it back to Denver a few years later, working on-air at KIMN, KTLN and KGMC. He continued his spot writing at KGMC producing spots on spec as a way of luring advertisers to the low-rated station.

In 1961, he started Fred Arthur Productions. Soon he was writing and producing radio commercials for advertisers and agencies throughout the U.S. and Canada, including over 600 spots for the American Lung Association.

In Denver he is remembered for such spots as Gray Moving and Storage, Grease Monkey, Mountain States Bank and Hugh Tighe's Skyline Dodge.

In 1975, Arthur was selected to appear long with Stan Freberg, and Chuck Blore as one of the country's three leading exponents of Humor in Advertising. and was featured on a CBS series "Sense of American Humor" hosted by Roger Mudd.

Honored with 9 Clio Awards among many other accolades, Arthur claims that his greatest honor came when Vick Knight, a former producer of the Fred Allen show said his spots were "as funny as anything we ever presented on the Allen series when I was producing it." Those commercials were for Johnny Haas Lincoln-Mercury in Denver.

E. G. Beehler

Elmer BeehlerElmer Beehler was one of the earliest pioneers in broadcasting, not just in Colorado, but nationwide. With little formal eduction, Beehler became an engineer and inventor. The backspace key on the typewriter is among his many patents for which he received $25 and a free typewriter.

Beehler started Colorado's third oldest radio station KGEK in Yuma in 1921. The station featured his hand-built transmitter and broadcasting equipment. To increase his audience, E.G. sold radios from his own electrial store.

From 1921 to January of 1925, his station was licensed under the Department of Commerce with the call letters KGEK. It was the 3rd oldest station in Colorado.

In 1934, he moved KGEK to Sterling where he continued to own and operate the station, turning over the business side of the station to son-in law Al Ross in the 1940s. Beehler then concentrated on his engineering duties at KGEK until it's sale in 1966.

The following year, Beehler and Ross built and operated KNAB in Burlington with Beehler again overseeing the engineering. Beehler represents the spirit of the small-town radio station operator who legacy on the airwaves of Eastern Colorado continues to this day.

Art Peterson

Art PetersonArt Peterson decided at the tender age of nine that he wanted to be a radio announcer. The year was 1927, and after listening to a boxing match on the radio, he said to his Mother and Father "When I grow up, I'm going to be a broadcaster".

He achieved that goal in 1940 when he was hired as a staff announcer at Station KFBC in Cheyenne. That started a broadcast career that spanned 41 years, and ended in Denver on Channel 9 in 1981. He went into military service in November of 1942 and spent his entire military career at Fort Francis E. Warren in Cheyenne, as an instructor in public affairs. He received a medical discharge in 1944, returned briefly to KFBC, then joined KVOD in Denver later that year.

In 1960 he went into TV at Channel 2, then moved to Channel 9 in 1962. He was an anchor on the 10PM news in the early part of his career there, then was named "Man On The Go", traveling as a foreign correspondent for the station with assignments in Vietnam, The Dominican Republic, Europe, South America, Japan, Australia and New Zealand.

He retired in 1981 from Channel 9, and was named Public Relations Manager for St. Anthony Hospital and Flight For Life Helicopters. He served there until late 1984 and then at age 66, retired for good.

Russell Scott "Blinky the Clown"

Ed ScottBlinky The ClownInheriting his love of the circus from his father, Russell Scott began developing his clown persona while exhibiting a miniature handmade circus he built in while working at Sears in Oklahoma.

The popularity of his display as a marketing tool led to a sales job in Colorado Springs and the attention of the city's television stations who wanted him to host a daily kids show. One station passed because Scott wanted to use the show as a way of educating kids and parents about safety. KKTV was the station that gave him the freedom to create the program format that was to last almost 4 decades.

Taking the name "Blinky", Scott spent six years at KKTV before Tribune Broadcasting lured him north to KWGN in Denver where he spent another 32 years mixing vaudeville-style humor, safety tips and cartoons on one of the longest running childrens' programs in the nation.

"Blinky's Fun Club" spanned the generations, and it was common for parents who'd been on the show while they were kids to bring their own kids to the show decades later.

An the end of the show's run in 1998, Blinky's show was the last local clown kids show in the country and an example of the kind of locally produced programming for children that seldom exists today. Not ready to retire, Scott operated an antique store in Denver where he enjoyed talking with customers who knew him from his television days.

Russell Scott died in 2012 at the age of 91.

2004 Inductees

Jim Bennett

Jim BennettJim Bennett began his career by working at his local newspaper, The Las Animas Leader. In 1941, Bennett's took his first radio job at KOKO Radio in La Junta, Colorado. Then he moved to Denver and worked for KFEL and KOA in Denver. After serving in the Navy in World War II, he studied Journalism at the University of Denver. In 1947 joined the news staff at KLZ radio. In 1953 KLZ-TV Channel 7 in Denver went on the air. He moved to television as News Cameraman, In 1955, he was Weatherman Bennett on the 10 p.m. News with two other BPC Hall of Fame members, Carl Akers and Starr Yelland.

He was a Channel 7 News photographer, News Writer and Newscaster before being promoted to News Director in 1957. He held that position until 1971 when he joined Colorado State University as Director of Communications.

At Channel 7 Bennett received numerous local and national awards. He was the Producer of the documentary Road to Nowhere which won the Sigma Delta Chi award for television documentaries, the Radio/Television News Directors Edward R. Murrow award for television public service, and a National Emmy Award. In 1968. Jim Bennett was named Outstanding Journalist by the University of Colorado.

Mr. Bennett served as President of the National Press Photographers Association and the Colorado Chapter of Sigma Delta Chi, and also served on the Board of Directors at the Denver Press Club.

After his retirement from CSU, he became active in Poudre Canyon Fire Protection District and donated over 2000 hours to Poudre Valley Hospital.

Dick Schmidt

Dick SchmidtWhen KMYR went on the air in the early 40's, Dick Schmidt was one of the young, talented on-air personalities who helped the station compete with the big radio stations in Denver. Schmidt and his good friend, Gene Amole, regaled audiences with on-air hijinks on shows like "Meet the Boys in the Band" while at the same time often airing sports events, newscasts and other more serious broadcasting fare.

In 1943, while a student at the University of Denver, Schmidt got a summer job at KOA and then worked his way through college and law school at KMYR. Thus, the field of law and the media were combined in his long and prestigious career. He never intended to practice law. He went to law school because his father thought it would be good training for whatever Dick ended up doing. In 1949 and 1950, he was deputy district attorney for the city and county of Denver.

In 1950 , he went into private practice where he often helped many local broadcast types with legal issues. He want up against fine lawyers including Supreme Court Justice Byron White, Lured to Washington, DC in 1965, he served with the US Information Agency and later with the famed legal firm Cohn and Marks. Among his clients was the Mutual Broadcasting System. Ultimately, Schmidt became General Counsel for the American Society of Newspaper Editors, a position he held for 30 years. Leaders of that organization hail him as their hero, savior, counselor, defender and friend.

Charles Upton

Charlie UptonCharles Upton passed the FCC test and received a Radio Television First
Class license when he was only 19 years old. He started in the business in Bangor, Maine at WJOR, a 250 watt radio station. Two years later he joined WARE radio in Ware, Maine. In 1950, he moved to Colorado Springs as an Engineer at KRDO Radio.

For the next 54 years, with a couple of years out to serve in the US Army, Mr. Upton was assigned all kinds of tasks for KRDO AM and FM, KRDO-TV, KJCT-TV and KHII (now KSXX). He moved the radio station into the new building when KRDO-TV went on the air in 1953. Upton became Chief Engineer in 1960 and worked on KRDO's first color broadcasts, first live production truck, built a microwave system from KBTV (now KUSA) to KRDO-TV, built KRDO-FM, and implemented KRDO's first portable cameras and VCRs. He moved the TV transmitter to the top of Cheyenne Mountain in 1959 to expand the station's reach and installed a more modern transmitter in 1980. He built KJCT in Grand Junction in 1979 .

Upton led KRDO's entry into the digital age by automating the TV and Radio stations
with file server playback systems, culminating the delivery of digital TV signals from KRDO-DTV in 2003. He even installed new phone systems in all three KRDO buildings.

Married with five children and 11 grandchildren, Charles Upton is thinking about retiring but says he will miss broadcasting.

Ken Wilmot

Ken WilmotKen Wilmot was inducted into the Army on graduation from High School.
While serving in Heidelberg, Germany, he was assigned to Soldier Shows, which combine with the USO in 1946. These actors, musicians and artists that created plays and concerts for the troops.

Discharged and returning to New York in 1947, he became a Lab Tech at Agfa-Ansco, and attended Pratt Institute. Graduating in 1951, Ken took a full time position as Art Director for Eastern Corporation and married Marie Self of Englewood, Colorado.

While in Denver, he talked to Clayton Brace, Program Director for a future television station, KLZ. Brace was waiting for the FCC for KLZ-TV approval to go on the air. In September of 1952, Wilmot, Bill Witt and Jerry Wyatt were hired to form the nucleus of KLZ-TV 's production department. For the next 23 years, Wilmot worked at KLZ as Art Director, and Graphics Manager and later Manager of Time-Life 7 Productions. In 1965 he was elected President of the Denver Art Directors Club. Some of the KLZ included designing and building a reflex telescope for TV camera close-ups of DU football games; redesigning the black and white TV sets from 8 shades of gray and black to produce a warmer color; and the many changes moving into video tape, color cameras and color film.

In 1976, Wilmot joined KRMA-TV 6, and became Manager of Film and Graphics. He designed the new logo for KRMA, putting them on an equal footing with the other TV channels. Ken remained there until he retired in the 90s.


2003 Inductees

Bette Bailly

Bette BaillyBette Bailly was almost one of a kind. In many of her college engineering classes, she was the only female. In 1967, she showed up at KNAB-AM in Burlington Colorado. Her background was engineering and on-air experience as an all night disc jockey at a struggling top-40 radio station in Great Falls, Montana.

She intended to work there only 30 days, helping to put the station on the air. Now, over 30 years later, she is still there, and now she owns the station and its FM sister which went on the air in 1980.

Bette has become a major voice of small market radio by in both the Colorado and National Broadcast Associations. She chairs their CBA board of Directors and also has served on NAB's small market board. Bette has served on the Burlington Chamber of Commerce as a past president and secretary-treasurer. She held several key positions in the Rotary Club at the local and district level. She is currently the chairperson of the Morgan Community College Advisory Board and the Kit Carson County Fair Board.

Bette has also received the Athena Goddess Award in 1995, the Colorado Broadcasting Associations Citizen of the Year Award in 1996, and has received the Colorado Broadcasters Association's prestigious Rex Howell Award for 2004.

Bob Butz

Bob ButzThey called him Cowboy Butz back in 1947 when he was one of the voices heard on the brand new radio station in Boulder, KBOL. Bob actually launched his long and illustrious Colorado broadcasting career at another new station, KCRT in Trinidad, his home town. After graduating from Trinidad Junior College, Bob dropped the Cowboy moniker when he became News Director at KBOL. He served in that capacity several years, except for a two year army stint.

In 1953, he was hired by KLZ Radio to replace Carl Akers who had been groomed for the night TV anchor position when KLZ-TV, Channel 7 went on the air Nov. 1, 1953.
Within a week, Akers decided to return to radio. Bob began airing the mid-day news on Channel 7, a position he held for 19 years as well as Saturday and Sunday night telecasts over many of those years. He was also a major fixture on KLZ radio, doing morning newscasts during this same period. After Time-Life sold the KLZ properties in 1972, Bob was named news director for KLZ Radio, a position he held for four years, In 1971, he began work at Talking Books, narrating books and periodicals for the blind and physically handicapped, where he received a prestigious Alexander Scourby Award.

Bob is active in community affairs and over the years has devoted much of his time to Masonic endeavors, including Denver's El Jebel Shrine.

Leon "Stormy" Rottman

Stormy RottmanLeon Stormy Rottman was not a weather forecaster by occupation.  He was  a Weathercaster by dedication.  That's what was written about the late Channel 9 weatherman when he received the Board of Governors Award Emmy from the Colorado Chapter of the National Television Arts and Sciences in 1990.

Stormy was called the Pied Piper by former colleague Bill Kuster, because people followed him and believed in his forecasts and his on-camera style.  That style was honed by military service as a meteorologist and by his natural affinity to project a twinkle in his eye as he appeared on the home TV screen.

Stormy began his career as a meteorologist with the Air Force as a briefing officer during World War II in the Pacific.

During the Korean War, he had the chance to work part time for a local TV station while he was stationed at Lake Charles, Louisiana.  Stormy was heard on Armed Forces Radio from Tokyo in the mid 1950's.  In 1957, he was transferred to the North American Air Defense Command in Colorado Springs where he worked at KRDO-TV

in his spare time.

Another radio stint with the American Forces Network in Germany followed in the early 60's.  He joined KBTV-Channel 9 in Denver in 1969 and from there started a new career as talk show host for KRMA-Channel 6's Senior Showcase.

Shortly before Stormy's death in 1993, Rocky Mountain News Radio-TV columnist Dusty Saunders wrote these words.  "Although Leon Rottman has a central-casting nickname for a Weathercaster, it really doesn't fit his personality.  He is much more "Sunny" than "Stormy".

Bob Shriver

Bob ShriverBob Shriver was the first announcer on Denver television when KFEL-TV, Channel 2 went on the air in 1952. Over a 40 year span, Shriver spent 20 years on the air and 20 years in sales.

Following service in the navy, he enrolled in the broadcast and radio curriculum at the University of Denver. In 1948, he began announcing part time at KFEL Radio, the Mutual network affiliate. Following his graduation from DU, Bob became a full-time announcer at the station. Soon, in addition to his announcing duties, he became one of the first Denver on-air Television personalities on locally produced programs. Bob was a pioneer in the early years of production in Colorado broadcasting.

In 1955, he joined KOA Radio and Television, whose studios were in the NBC building on California Street in downtown Denver. He appeared on both Channel 4, and on KOA radio. Bob’s voice was heard on the 50,000 watt station broadcasting remotes of top big bands from the famous Trocadero Ballroom at Elitch Gardens.

In 1969, Bob joined the sales staff of KLZ-TV, Channel 7. He rounded out his 4 decades in the business by serving as regional sales representative for Pikes Peak Broadcasting stations in Colorado Springs and Grand Junction. He served 40 years with the Arvada Volunteer Fire Department.

2002 Inductees

Tom Cook

Tom CookW. Thomas Cook has been involved in broadcasting for more than 50 years. According to Tom, it combined the "Real" world of broadcasting and the academic world of educating students in telecommunications. He was active in radio, television, film and electronic media. Tom is a true pioneer in broadcast education. He established the first full broadcasting curriculum in Colorado at Metropolitan State College. He has supported the efforts of public broadcasting on the board and advisory council of KRMA-TV (Rocky Mountain PBS) for 32 years. On the air and behind the camera and mike, Tom Cook is distinguished for his leadership, service and expertise he has provided to his students, his listeners and his viewers.

Merrie Lynn

Merrie LynnMerrie Lynn is well known as and On-Air Talent. In addition, she has been an executive, author, lecturer. Merrie Lynn's versatility has been observed and honored in a variety of prestigious and important settings. Her distinguished career in broadcasting includes innovative approaches to programming for Denver radio and television audiences. An expert interviewer, Merrie Lynn is equally adept at posing questions to celebrities and to ordinary, every day folks with interesting stories to tell. In her broadcasting career, she has served as special events director, producer, host of numerous live remote broadcasts and as a key member of the management team. Merrie Lynn gained further distinction during her service as Colorado's first lady. Today her presentation skills are being utilized as a top lecturer and instructor for Homeland Security around the country.

Beverly Martinez

Beverly MartinezBeverly Martinez is a key figure in Public Service to the community through the station she has represented for nearly three decades. As Public Affairs Manager at KWGN-TV-WB2. she has developed and spearheaded charitable fundraising efforts and creative community programs for countless worthwhile causes. In one recent year alone, Martinez directed WB2 Charities in giving more than $3 Million to non-profit organizations focused on helping families and children. She was one of the founding partners of the Healing Fund, an outlet for those who wished to help the recovery process after the Columbine tragedy. Beverly's first broadcast job was as producer and host of "Denver Now", a community forum for social and cultural issues. She served in leadership capacities with several organizations related to broadcasting and the community.

Joe Tennessen

Joe TennessenThey call him Mister Greeley. Joe Tennessen started his career in radio long before he went on the air. As a boy in Wisconsin, Joe would lie in bed at night and pretend he was the sports announcer he was listening to on the radio. At age 16, he was actually serving as the color announcer on broadcasts of high school sports. For the past 35 years, Joe has been the voice of Weld County in KFKA-AM in Greeley. Over the years, Tennessen was host of the popular "Up With Weld County" community-based morning talk show. He has served the station in both management and ownership. He recently retired from the radio station, but continues in a new venture in banking. Joe continues his contributions to numerous community projects in and around Greeley.

2001 Inductees

Ed "Weatherman" Bowman

Ed BowmanWeatherman Bowman was born and raised on a farm in Iowa City, Iowa. Early on he was an active pilot. Those were the qualifications he thought were needed for anyone to talk about the weather. His first broadcast job was at WHO in Des Moines where Ronald Reagan was the Sports announcer. Ed arrived in Denver at KOA on New Year's Day, 1950. When TV came to Denver, Ed became "Weatherman" Bowman and the rest is history. He was the first Weatherman on KOA-TV Channel 4 and stayed there for 12 years. Being a Weatherman in the 50's was much different than today. There were no computer graphics of today. Fortunately, Weather man Bowman was an artist. He created weather maps in front of your eyes nightly. Maps filled with marvelous clouds and "troughs aloft" that were real works of art. His hand-drawn weather maps became collectors' items. When he left TV, he did radio weather broadcasts for a Kansas network from his studio in his Denver home. His distinctive mid-western drawl and no nonsense approach made him a media Icon. Ed " Weatherman" Bowman died July 4, 1994.

Jim Hawthorne

Jim HawthornJim was born in Victor, Colorado. He was the first voice heard when KMYR signed on the air on April 21, 1941. After military duty, Jim found a home in the Los Angeles market where his radio and TV programs established me as a national personality. His "nutty" radio shows were carried on ABC, NBC, CBS and Mutual Radio networks in the 1940's. In the 60's, Hawthorne was a success with his "unusual" TV Programming in LA.. Steve Allen wrote about Jim's TV and radio innovation in three of his books about broadcast talent and programs. In 1965, he "retired" and went on a vacation to Hawaii. He stayed there 4 years, developing a children's show called "Checkers and Pogo" with a former KIMN Radio personality Pogo Poge. Hawthorne returned to Denver in 1974 and went to work for KOA Radio, eventually becoming Promotion Manager and Program Director.

Fred & Fae Taylor

Fred n FaeFred and Fae Taylor were kids from Altoona, Pennsylvania who got married on Thanksgiving Day, 1945. They found out you could make a living in vaudeville pantomiming records. They played the famed Palace Theater in New York twice, did Grossingers and the Ed Sullivan Show. Leaving a gig in North Dakota, they were looking for a place to park their trailer. That place was Denver. Local TV history was made on December 19, 1953 when the "Soda Shop" began on KFEL-TV, Channel 2. In 1955 Fred and Fae moved to Channel 9 with the "Club House Gang". In 1957 the move was to Channel 7 for "Fred 'n Fae". An estimated 55,000 kids got to be on TV with Fred 'n Fae during their 15 years on TV. Fred and Fae went out on top in December 1967. Fred died far too early. Fae was able to join the Inductees into the Hall of Fame in 2001 and accept the award for Fred and Fae. She passed away a short time after her induction into the Hall of Fame.

Starr Yelland

Starr YellandStarr Yelland got his first broadcasting break at WMT in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. Proving "there's no business like show business," Starr worked as an MC for a touring table tennis night club act and traveled in San Francisco. While there, he auditioned for and was hired to do radio shows at the Golden Gate Exposition. Then, he met Lloyd Yoder who was about to become manager at KOA in Denver. Starr moved to Denver in 1940 to work for KOA. He was called into service and served in the South Pacific, including tie on Iwo Jima. After that, it was back to KOA until 1954 when he moved to KLZ. Starr hosted the first radio talk show called "Party Line". On TV, in addition to his well remembered evening sports reports, there was "Starr's Matinee" and "Dialing for Dollars. He interviewed more than 5,000 people on TV and many more than that on radio. Starr was the consummate sports journalist. Television enabled Starr to provide a completely new perspective to his work and allowed his unique personality to come out.

2000 Inductees

Carl Akers

Carl AkersOne of the best known names in Denver Television Journalsm was Carl Akers. Carl headed up the KLZ Radio and Television newsrooms that included two other BPC Hall of Fame inductees. They are Bob Butz (2003) and Jim Bennett (2004).

Carl Akers originally was a resident of Dennison, Texas. He graduated from the University of Missouri in 1948. He moved to Denver and went to work for KLZ Radio In 1953, KLZ-TV, Channel 7 in Denver went on the air. Carl became the 10 PM News Anchor, worked for a week and decided to go back to radio. Carl was a man of conviction, and didn't feel he should have to wear a necktie on the air after years in the radio business. One of the first sponsors of Chann. The rest is history. He went on to make Channel 7 the long running Number one News station in Denver.

In 1966 he retired to travel in Europe. By 1967, he began a second Television News career, going to work for KBTV, Channel 9 in Denver. His news and management acumen helped Channel 9 move into the #1 rated newscast in 1975. His leadership kept the station on top of the ratings long after he retired.

Carl was a true journalism professional who made a profound impression on the Broacast Journalsim community.

Carl Akers legacy includes his tremendous news accomplishments as well as personally being one of the most popular Anchors in Denver TV history.

Bob Martin

Bob MartinBob Martin came to Denver in January of 1954 after starting his broadcasting career in Oak Park, Illinois.  His first Denver job was Program Director for KMYR.  In 1960, he became co-owner and General Manager of KMOR in Littleton.  Then, in 1965, he started Denver's first Sports Talk Show. 

It was at KTLN that his long relationship with the Denver Broncos began.  In 1960 Bob was named Sport Director of the KOA stations. That included a week night Sport Talk show on Radio, and for 14 years regular evening Sportscasts on KOA-TV, and of course the Broncos .  He was the Sports Director of KOA Radio until his death in February 1990.

Bob was honored as Colorado Sportscaster of the year 22 times. He was the sports voice on  broadcasts of the Broncos for 25 years, University of Colorado, Colorado State and Air Force Football.  Basketball play-by-play includes the Denver Rockets, Denver-Chicago Truckers, the AAU Tournament, NCAA finals and University of Colorado. He also did the Denver Bears. Bob's national credits include the US and British Opens, and PGA Golf. People who know him know his favorite was one of his first sports broadcast jobs, University of Denver Hockey.

Beyond sports, Bob anchored  On-Air Election Night Coverage at KOA. At KMYR he hosted an afternoon music show, and at KMOR a classical music program.

He was both Executive Director and President of the Colorado Broadcaster's Association.  He received the CBA's Broadcaster of the Year Award and their Broadcast Achievement Award. He was inducted into the Colorado Sports Hall of fame in 1991, and into the University of Denver Hall of Fame in 1997.

Bob Martin was a superb communicator with the ability to use the English language. He painted pictures with words so well that many of his listeners saw more from his radio broadcasts than those who were watching on television.

Ed Scott

Ed ScottEd was born in Denver, but by the 6th grade, was living with him grandparents in Englewood, a relocation in the "Country" to recover from childhood tuberculosis. He graduated from Englewood High School at age 16. When he was 17, he attended a DU summer session , enrolled at the University of Washington to study broadcasting. Soon he dropped out of school to work to keep his teenage record show which he shared advertising revenues with the station. It eventually led to a full time job with KING in Seattle.

In 1947, Ed returned to Denver, first to KOA-AM, then to KLZ-AM. His network announcing debut came at age 19 after he moved to WBBM, CBS in Chicago. His network radio credits include "People Are Funny," "Sky King," "The Gene Autry Show" and "The Quiz Kids." Network TV commercials involve the "Wednesday Night Fights," "Ben Casey, ""My Three Sons" and "Lucy."

In 1953, Ed moved back to Denver. When KLZ-TV Channel 7 went on the air, he became Sheriff Scotty, a top rated show that Ed produced and performed in for nine years.

In 1961. shortly before his 33rd birthday, he pooled all his resources on a radio station located in an old ranch house in Lakewood. Five years later, KLAK was a state-of-the-art facility and the station was positioned to become a ratings leader. KLAK-FM came in 1966, then a background music/sound system named Accent Sound in 1970. In 1971, KFEZ-AM went on the air in Kansas City. Ed sold his businesses in 1976.

Ed Scott then began a career in politics, first in the Englewood City Council, followed two years later as Colorado's youngest Mayor. In 1984, Ed turned his talent to print. His current events column was featured in the Denver Post and in 63 other newpapers in 30 states.

He also hosted and narrated a TV program about Denver in the 1940's called "There Was A Time." The program won a national "Telly."

Bill Stewart

Bill StewartWilliam G. "Bill" Stewart was born in Winfield, Kansas, but attended school in Colby, Kansas. After High School, he attended Kansas State University, working on an Electrical Engineering degree. His education was interrupted to serve three years in the Army Air Corps. He left the service with the rank of Sergeant, after 2 years in the Asian Theater.

In 1947 he attended Columbia University in New York as a Radio-TV Major, and also was an announcer in Colby. In 1948, on to the University of Denver where he got his degree in Radio-TV. At the same time, he was working at KMYR as the night news editor, and for 6 months at KOA as a news writer for Starr Yelland. In 1950, Bill

began several years in Greely at KFKA. He started in sales and moved up to General Manager. In 1951, he married Lila Jean Bohlender. Next stops were General Manager of KGHF in Pueblo, and in 1958 G.M. of KWRL in Riverton, Wyoming.

In 1959 Bill and Lila Jean found their home. He became President and G.M. of KLMO in Longmont. It was 250 watts. In 1964, Bill got FCC approval to go to 10,000 watts, at that time second in power only to KOA in Colorado. In 1969. KLMO-FM went on the air.

Bill built a small, low powered radio station into a solid broadcast facility serving the Longmont area. Bill and Lila Jean live in Longmont, and are active in the community.

Bill is a lifetime member of the American Legion and the Veterans of Foreign Wars. He is a past president of the Colorado Broadcasters Association and has received the National Public Relations Award from the American Legion. The list of service clubs and his dedication to the community includes The Longmont Symphony, the Longmont United Hospital, the University of Colorado and University of Northern Colorado to name a few. Bill and wife Lila Jean have thrived in Longmont, and given so much in return to their home town.

1999 Inductees

Gene Amole

Gene AmoleGene is a Denver native whose career as a journalist was interrupted twice by wars. Shortly after he began his Broadcast career, he served in World War II in General George Patton's Third United States Army. Later Gene was a civilian war correspondent in the Korean War. He was a partner in DEN, KVOD-FM and KTUX in Pueblo. Gene was a pioneer in Denver television and known for his weekend newscasts "Deadline" and "Masthead" on KLZ-TV, Channel 7 in Denver. He has won and Emmy and a Peabody Award for his television work. He was also an award-winning columnist for the Denver Rocky Mountain News. Amole spent the last year of his life writing columns about his last year in life. He knew his life was ending, and shared his feeling with his vast audience of Radio and TV viewers, and Rocky Mountain News readers he had entertained for years. Gene died on May 12, 2002, just 12 days shy of his 79th birthday.

Harry Hoth

Harry HothHoth was born in Overland, Missouri and moved to Colorado to attend Colorado College. While in school, he began a career at KRDO that spans nearly half-century. From part-time in promotions and sales, he worked his way to President, General Manager and majority owner of KRDO AM/TV, later added FM in Colorado Springs and KJCT-TV in Grand Junction. Harry has always been active in his community, serving on the planning commission, city council and as mayor. His commitment to fraternal, religious and charitable organization is legendary.

Reynelda Muse

Reynelda MuseReynelda was born in Ohio, but a fortunate twist of fate brought her to Denver. She started at KOA-TV, now KCNC-TV, as a general assignment reporter, and left 29 years later with the acclaim of her TV peers and thanks from the Denver community for her extra efforts. Rey was the first woman and first African American to anchor a TV newscast in Colorado. She was one of Cable News Network's 12 original anchors. Her work won one Emmy and three other Emmy nominations. Rey is a member of the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences Silver Circle.

Gene O'Fallon

Gene O' FallonGene O'Fallon was born in St. Louis, Missouri, but anyone who knew him will tell you he was Irish. Gene moved to Denver in 1901 with his family after his father died. In 1923, he started his broadcast career as partner in a 7 and 1/2 watt station called KFEL. O'Fallon become one of the formative broadcast influences in the Denver Radio and Television market. He put KFEL-TV on the air in 1952. This was the first Television station in Denver and Colorado. In addition to his contributions to Colorado, O"Fallon was a founding member of BMI and of the National Association of Broadcasters. The National Academy of Arts and Sciences posthumously gave Gene O'Fallon an Emmy in 1992 for a lifetime of work which fostered and enhanced the industry in this region.

1998 Inductees

Rex Howell

Rex HowellRex Howell was born in 1907 in Norton, Kansas. Early in his life, his family moved to Longmont, Colorado and it was there he became interested in 'wireless." He learned Morse Code at 10 and was building his own radio transmission equipment from Mason Jars, batteries and oatmeal canister coils. By 1921 this self taught radio pioneer had his first license and had broadcast a signal heard in Boulder, twenty miles away. In high school, he worked for KFEL as an announcer, and janitor.

In 1926, he put KFXJ on the air in Edgewater with 15 watts. In 1927 he increased power to 50 watts. In 1930, CBS gave their affiliation to KLZ. Now with power up to 100 watts, he moved to the western slope at the urging of the Grand Junction Chamber of Commerce.

During the depression, Howell wen to Dr. O.M. Morrison and said he needed a lot of money - $750.00. Dr. Morrison wrote him a check for $1,000, an investment that paid off for the community Rex Howell chose to serve.

1942. KFXJ was authorized to build a new 1,000 watt station. On May 4th, 1954, he provided the Grand Valley with KREX-TV, its first TV station. It was followed by KREY in Montrose and KREZ in Durango, completing the XYZ Televison Network.

WORX, a Howell ham radio station was used for Colorado families to talk to their loved ones overseas during World War II and Vietnam. In broadcasting, he was the first president of the Colorado Broadcasters Association, Chairman of the National Association of Broadcasters, a director of BMI land on the Board of Advisors for CBS, the network that passed him over in 1930. Not bad for a guy with a high school diploma who built his barries from Mason Jars.

Today, one of the most coveted award from the CBA is the Rex Howell Award. A tribute to a real broadcast pioneer who has had a profound impact on the industry.

Pete Smythe

Pete SmythePete is a man of the West, born in Glenrock Wyoming in 1911. A clue of what was to come, Pete's folds ran a General Store. He was on the State Championship basketball team, and had taken up music, playing saxophone and clarinet. Just out of High School, he formed the Whiz Bank Four dance band that traveled in Wyoming, Montana and Utah. By 1930, the Pete Smyth Orchestra was a fixture on campus, as he studied Business Administration.

Off to Hollywood 1935 and 36, playing in the Orville Knapp Orchestra at the Beverly Willshire Hotel. Then back to Denver where he married Peggy Simpson and until 1941, his orchestra worked the Cosmopolitan Hotel, the Brown Palace, the Broadmoor and Eddie Ott's.

In 1941, it was "Meet the Boys in the Band" on KMYR. By 1945, he had joined KLZ as a salesman, then Program Director. Then Hollywood again, where he wrote for many top network radio shows including Stars Over Hollywood, My Favorite Story with Ronald Coleman, The Bing Crosby Show, Eddie Bracken Show, Edgar Bergen and others.

He returned to Denver in 1948. He started his General Store show on KTLN and by 1951 it was Smythe's General Store on KOA. He created an imaginary town, East Tincup, got himself named Mayor and had regular visitors for listeners and eventually viewers. To his listeners and viewers, East Tincup became a big part of their broadcast life.

He semi-retired in 1969 to travel, write play golf, ride horses and goof off. This meant being active in the commmunity. His public service included being a member of the Cattlemen's Association, Chairman of the Denver Boy's Club and on the board of the State Historical Foundation.

Hugh B. Terry

Hugh TerryHugh B. Terry has been described as a dedicated journalist and a savvy businessman. That's the combination that made his history as a radio and TV station manager so remarkable.

He was born in Alexandria, Nebraska in 1908. In 1930, he graduated form the U. of Missouri with a BA . of Journalism. His start was in St. Louis at an ad agency as a copy writer. In 1932, he went to work of Oklahoma Publishing CO. as a salesman for WKY in Oklahoma City. In 1936, he was named manager of KVOR in Colorado Springs.

When he arrived at KLZ radio in 1941, Hugh Terry assembled a bright young staff that filled the station's offices with awards. He donated his own time to numerous civic and charitable organizations.

One of his lasting accomplishments was to write a series of editorials in 1955 that led to the opening of Colorado courtrooms to cameras and tape recorders. It confirms a statement by Vincent Wasilewski, a former president of the NAB, that "Terry is a leader who has always argued vehemently for broadcasting's rights to editorialize."

Among an impressive list of activities, he was a director of the National Association of Broadcasters. As a sparkplug on the NAB and BMB directorates, a member of the NAB Industry-Wide Code Observance Committee and the sole American broadcaster invited to UNESCO Program Commission Conference, Terry played a unique role in industry activity.

Denver television viewers rewarded his courage and creativity. Channel 7, owned by Time Inc. for most of his tenure, rode high in the ratings--No. 1 for 20 years, through his retirement in 1974.

He had a sense that few other managers had at the time. Many television managers--even today--come up through the business side of broadcasting. Terry was a journalist; he understood journalism and journalistic ethics. He was often referred to as "Mr. Broadcasting," but the title embarrassed him.

Hugh Berkley Terry died November 28, 1987, at the age of 78.